Two New Interviews: Christopher Paul Carey and Mark Wheatley on SWORDS AGAINST THE MOON MEN

Andy Nunez has interviewed artist Mark Wheatley and me on Swords Against the Moon Men over at Ares Magazine. Mark provided sixteen wonderful interior illustrations for the novel, and it was an absolute pleasure to work with him again (Mark also painted the cover art for my book Exiles of Kho a few years back). In the scene pictured here, Mark illustrates Julian 7th battling a lunar monster called a mo-lah-kar.

Read both interviews here.

Illustration (c) 2017 Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.

Now available: SWORDS AGAINST THE MOON MEN, an authorized sequel to Edgar Rice Burroughs’ THE MOON MAID and THE MOON MEN

I am pleased to announce the release of my latest novel, Swords Against the Moon Men, volume 6 in the Wild Adventures of Edgar Rice Burroughs. I’ve been a Burroughs fan since the age of eight, and the publication of this novel marks the achievement of a major life ambition to write an authorized ERB novel.

Publisher’s Description
An all-new science fantasy adventure novel by the acclaimed coauthor of the Ancient Opar series, Christopher Paul Carey

Cover art by Chris Peuler and interior illustrations by Mark Wheatley

Book #6 in the Wild Adventures of Edgar Rice Burroughs series
Hailed by author and science fiction scholar Richard Lupoff as a “masterpiece of science fiction” and a “pioneer work of the modern school of social extrapolation in science fiction,” Edgar Rice Burroughs’ classic lunar trilogy—The Moon Maid, The Moon Men, and The Red Hawk—tells the generational tale of humanity’s fight for freedom against alien conquerors from the Moon. The hero, Julian, finds his soul perpetually reincarnated in the bodies of his successive grandsons, fated to confront—down through the centuries —the vicious Kalkars who have subjugated Earth.

The epic saga continues in this novel, Swords Against the Moon Men.

In 2076 AD, Earth has been conquered and humanity brutally enslaved under the cruel tyranny of the Kalkar invaders whose evil was spawned from Va-nah, the Moon’s hollow interior. Julian 7th—descendant of the great hero who led the first expedition to Va-nah and nearly defeated the Kalkars—receives a mysterious transmission from the planet Barsoom.

The desperate plea from the Red Planet swiftly hurls Julian upon a lonely quest into the heart of Va-nah where he teams up with an U-ga princess and a fierce alien quadruped, and launches a daring rescue to save a lost Barsoomian ambassadorial mission. The success of this mission depends on an unlikely alliance with the Warlord of Mars to assail the enemy’s impregnable stronghold.

If Julian fails in this quest, humanity—and the entire solar system—will never escape the iron grip of the Moon Men.

Order SWORDS AGAINST THE MOON MEN now from AmazonEdgarRiceBurroughs.com, or Lulu.com.

AUTHOR: Christopher Paul Carey
Christopher Paul Carey is the coauthor with Philip José Farmer of The Song of Kwasin, and the author of Exiles of Kho; Hadon, King of Opar; and Blood of Ancient Opar, all works set in Farmer’s Khokarsa series, which was inspired by the timeless works of Edgar Rice Burroughs. He has also scripted two comic books from Dynamite Entertainment featuring iconic characters created by Edgar Rice Burroughs: Pathfinder Worldscape: Lord of the Jungle One-Shot and Pathfinder Worldscape: Dejah Thoris One-Shot. His short fiction may be found in anthologies such as The Avenger: The Justice, Inc. Files; Doc Ardan: The Abominable Snowman; Ghost in the Cogs: Steam-Powered Ghost Stories; The Many Tortures of Anthony Cardno; Tales of the Shadowmen; Tales of the Wold Newton Universe; and The Worlds of Philip José Farmer. Carey is a senior editor at Paizo—working on both the award-winning Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and Starfinder—and he has edited numerous collections, anthologies, and novels. Carey holds a master’s degree in Writing Popular Fiction and lives in Western Washington.

COVER ART: Chris Peuler
Chris Peuler is a genre illustrator based in Chicago, working primarily in fantasy and science fiction. A traditionally trained digital painter, Chris has created vivid imagery for various gaming and book publications. His first full wraparound dust jacket painting for Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., was the cover art for Lee Strong’s novel, A Soldier of Poloda: Further Adventures Beyond the Farthest Star.

INTERIOR ILLUSTRATIONS: Mark Wheatley
Mark Wheatley holds the Eisner, Inkpot, Mucker, Gem, Speakeasy awards and nominations for the Harvey and the Ignatz as well as being an inductee to the Overstreet Hall of Fame. He has designed for Lady Gaga, The Black Eyed Peas, ABC’s Beauty and the Beast, and Square Roots, as well as Super Clyde, The Millers and 2 Broke Girls on CBS. His works include Doctor Cthulittle, Breathtaker, Return of the Human, Ez Street, Lone Justice, Mars, Black Hood, Prince Nightmare, Hammer of the Gods, Blood of the Innocent, Frankenstein Mobster, Miles the Monster, Skultar and Titanic Tales as well as Tarzan, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Jonny Quest, Dr. Strange, The Flash, Captain Action, Argus, The Spider, Stargate Atlantis, the Three Stooges, Torchwood and Doctor Who.

PUBLISHED BY

Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., Tarzana, California

Order SWORDS AGAINST THE MOON MEN now from AmazonEdgarRiceBurroughs.com, or Lulu.com.

 

Audio: Philip José Farmer announcing the Ancient Opar series, September 1, 1973

hoaoOn September 1, 1973, at the fourteenth annual Dum-Dum convention in honor of Edgar Rice Burroughs, Philip José Farmer made an exciting announcement about a new series he was writing: one set in an ancient civilization of which the lost city of Opar was but one far-flung queendom. The convention was held at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and hosted by the Burroughs Bibliophiles in conjunction with the 31st World Science Fiction Convention (TorCon II). Fortunately, an audio recording exists, which you can listen to below.

Farmer was the banquet speaker at the Burroughs convention. He was introduced by Burroughs Bulletin founding editor (and close friend of Phil and his wife Bette) Vern Coriell, who remarked during his introduction that the only reason Phil hadn’t won a Hugo Award that year is because they didn’t have a category for “Biography.”  The previous year, Doubleday had published Phil’s Tarzan Alive: A Definitive Biography of Lord Greystoke.

As a prelude to this announcement, Farmer discusses Tarzan Alive and his anthology on feral humans, Mother Was a Lovely Beast. The Ancient Opar announcement is at the 10:12 mark.

Listen to Philip José Farmer’s complete banquet address to the Burroughs Bibliophiles below.

 

Some interesting observations about the address:

  • You can hear Phil pronouncing the name “Hadon,” the hero of Hadon of Ancient Opar and Flight to Opar. Just as he indicated in his article “The Khokarsan Language” (available in the Restored Edition of Flight to Opar published by Meteor House in 2015), he pronounces the “a” as “a low central spread vowel (as in Spanish)” and the “o” as “a mid-back rounded vowel (as in Spanish).” On other words: “Hä-dōn.”
  • Phil announces that Richard Corben would illustrate the cover of the first edition of Hadon of Ancient Opar. However, plans must have changed along the way, since Roy G. Krenkel ended up as the final cover artist. Corben later went on to illustrate the 1975 Fokker D-LXIX Press edition of A Feast Unknown.
  • Phil mentions that he envisioned the Ancient Opar series would encompass about ten books. He lived to write only three novels in the series (Hadon of Ancient Opar, Flight to Opar, and The Song of Kwasin), but the tale of Khokarsa continues to unfold in books such as Exiles of Kho, Hadon, King of Opar, and the forthcoming Blood of Ancient Opar.
  • Phil mentions Frank Brueckel and John Harwood’s essay on the history of Opar, which inspired his Ancient Opar series. While the lengthy article was then scheduled to appear in the Burroughs Bulletin, it never did. Many years later, however, the monograph was finally published in the book Heritage of the Flaming God, ed. Alan Hanson and Michael Winger, which is available here.
  • The “Ian” whom Phil calls out to in the audience in regard to the publication of John Flint Roy’s A Guide to Barsoom is publisher Ian Ballantine.
  • My favorite quote from this banquet address is a somewhat prophetic one: “Now I think it’s a measure of a writer’s true importance in the field of literature if the writer generates a tremendous amount of work past his own work.”

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